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The Home Fire and Safety Evaluation Program

Home Fire Safety Evaluations and Escape Plans

In an effort to keep our residents safe from fire and promote community safety, the Milton Fire-Rescue Department will conduct a free courtesy home safety evaluation. This service is offered to Milton residents and can be scheduled by telephone or e-mail.

During the fire safety evaluation of your home, members of the Milton Fire-Rescue Department will discuss various safety-related topics, such as:

  • Fire escape planning and exit drills in the home (E.D.I.T.H.)
  • Smoke detectors and their maintenance
  • Electrical safety
  • Proper storage/use of chemicals, combustibles and flammables
  • General home safety
  • Severe weather preparedness

Literature, Information and Web Links

If you do not wish to have a home visit, but are interested in receiving literature on home fire safety, we would be happy to provide helpful brochures and other guides on fire and safety planning.

You can also refer to the following links for more in-depth fire-related training:

The Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) online interactive courses are helpful for those looking for an in-depth review of community and personal safety/preparedness. The agency also offers online courses, including:

Requesting a Home Safety Evaluation

Home fire safety inspections can be scheduled between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday.

For more information or to schedule an inspection, please contact us at 678.242.2541 or via e-mail at fire.marshal@cityofmiltonga.us.

Home Fire Safety Tips

Please take the time to read these tips and share them with your friends and family.

  • Supervise young children closely. Do not leave them alone, even for short periods of time.
  • Keep matches and lighters in a secured drawer or cabinet.
  • Have your children tell you when and where they find matches and lighters.
  • Check under beds and in closets for burned matches, as this could be evidence your child is playing with fire.
  • Develop a home fire escape plan, practice it with your children and designate a meeting place outside.
  • Take the mystery out of fire play by teaching children that fire is a tool, not a toy.
  • Teach children the nature of fire. It is fast, hot, dark and deadly.
  • Teach children not to hide from firefighters, but to get out quickly and call for help from another location.
  • Show children how to crawl low on the floor, below the smoke, to get out of the house and stay out in the case of fire.
  • Demonstrate how to stop, drop to the ground and roll if their clothes catch fire.
  • Install smoke alarms on every level in your home.
  • Familiarize children with the sound of your smoke alarm.
  • Test the smoke alarm each month and replace the battery when you change your clocks for daylight savings time.
  • Replace the smoke alarm every 10 years or as recommended by the manufacturer.
  • The use of a fire extinguisher in the hands of a trained adult can be a life and property saving tool.